Tag Archives: bone spur

So…How is my foot doing now???

Standard

So, I’m sure I’ll get a lot of freaky foot fetish people finding this post, but I don’t care.  Having a few of my post surgery photos available for those who are going to be having the same procedure as me will be helpful, and I want to also let everyone know my progress now that I am 49 days post surgery.

Cliff Notes

Procedures-Bunionectomy (fix bunion on outside of foot), Cheilectomy (removal of bone spur), Arthritis of the big toe cleanout (called Hallux Rigidus…yeah, I’m only 31)….all on the right foot, big toe area.

Date of Procedure-Friday, June 10th, 2016 at Cardston Medical Clinic, performed by Dr. Williams of Chinook Foot & Ankle Clinic

before

“Before” X-Ray from May 2016.  Look at that nasty toe!

My original post about post surgery experience is here.  I had meant to do recaps on how I was doing each week, but yeah…summer happened.  What have I been doing?  Well, I am really, really tan from laying on our rooftop patio.  I also got a whole math course worked through for the fall, made answer keys for the Mathematics SL IB World Exam, crocheted three pairs of slippers, and generally went crazy.  I kept occupied.  But I needed exercise.  On June 27th, I was given permission to go in the water for deep water jogging while at my two-week post op.  I had never been so excited to be in a pool (note:  I hate swimming.  I am more of a pool, margarita and tan kind of girl).  I went to our local YMCA and got a one-month membership at just below $60.  I used it, I think, 28/30 days!  I started with deep water jogging, which felt weird as I could not really move my toes at all.  I was nervous to flutter kick.  I didn’t want my foot to bust open and then have the lifeguards close the pool because blood was everywhere.

27th

After 2nd post op on June 27th.  Bandages of, steri-strips remain.  Foot sewn together.

27th later

Later on the 27th, I had lost all but one steri-strip.  This is when I realized I didn’t want to bust my foot open

I also went lap swimming approximately 3 times.  That ended fast because I suck at swimming.  I even went and bought a good pair of goggles.  My best friend Ali, the swim coach, approved them, as she didn’t want me buying “cheap swimming lesson goggles.”  My preferred swimming stroke?  Lets call it “breast-paddle” or “doggy-stroke”.  I combine doggy paddle and breaststroke to create this beautiful form.  Gross.

I wasn’t going to be seeing my doctor again until July 21st, so I carefully kept walking in my medical shoe, making sure not to put pressure on the ball of my foot.  I iced a lot, and I was very careful.  About 3.5 weeks after surgery, all while still wearing the shoe, I had the need to sweat.  Walking more than around my yard was painstakingly slow, but I figured I would try an elliptical at the YMCA.  I kept the shoe on my right foot, with my Altra on my left, and got myself positioned on the elliptical.  Since you keep you feet flat and don’t have to go on the balls of your feet while using this machine, it provided another option in addition to water jogging.

As my healing progressed, I did more elliptical and less water jogging.  I would do the water jogging 2-3 times a week and would time it so I could stay in the pool an extra 45 minutes after the morning class and just water jog in the deep end by myself (a waterfit class was occurring in the shallow end).  My scab was gone, everything seemed to be healing fine, and my tattoo was lined up damn well!

18th july

July 18th, laying on the patio with the beagle.  Probably with a beer.

My 6 week post op was on July 21st.  Doctor said everything looked good, however, I needed to be doing some physio with my toes, as since I had been SO careful to not bend them or put pressure on them, I was not able to bend them on my own.  I was also a little nauseated when I saw the x-ray, as the screws look like they could have been taken from my husbands shop.  But, I am told they won’t set off metal detectors.  And, look how good that toe looks!  Straight!  No bump!  Bright white arthritis gone!

after

I’m officially screwed….hahaha

What have I done since then?  I have been to two physio appointments (I already had a physiotherapist from the months before) and he worked on my toes real good.  I’m doing exercises to bend them, and still icing as needed.  My YMCA membership expired yesterday, so I asked my physiotherapist if I could run today.  He knows how I am, and he told me to give it a shot.  My podiatrist also told me that when I did start running, I just would need to listen to my body.  So, I went to the lake and did 5 km!  I ran them very cautiously, with lots of walk breaks in mile 1, one walk break in mile 2 and then no walk breaks in mile 3.  My average pace: 10:52 a mile.  A far cry from my 7:13 a mile I ran back at a local 5km in May which was a few weeks after Boston.  But, I know there isn’t any racing for me in the near future.  I am not planning on ‘racing’ for the rest of 2016.  Just training and getting myself back to comfortable longer runs.  My goal race is the WDW Marathon Weekend, where I will be doing the Goofy Challenge (half marathon on Saturday, full marathon with my best friend on Sunday) and I am going to run them just for fun.  No time goal, no personal bests.  Just FUN!  My training for this race weekend begins officially on August 29th.

I was going to take a photo now of my foot before posting this, but I have been doing quite a bit today and had a sock on, so it’s really funky looking.  It feels great though!  Are my results and recovery normal for this type of surgery?  I am not really sure.  I know people who have had only the bunionectomy done and have had much more of a difficult time recovering.  My bunion was not completely horrible, but we decided to go ahead as I was being opened up anyway.  I was extra careful post surgery to not do too much and get infected…until I knew the scar had healed and wouldn’t bust open.  And while I told myself to wait until August 1st to try running, I knew being reasonable out there today would be alright.  I am looking forward to fully recovering and getting back to racing speed.

If you or anyone you know has questions about my procedures and recovery, please feel free to leave a comment or email me.

Marching on in March…

Standard

Oh man.  Where to start?

At the beginning of March, I opted to have a cortisone injection into my foot.  This was performed after I had a “test run” injection of some other solution (yeah, I’m that bad that I couldn’t even name what they injected into my foot…but then i referred to the photo i took and it was Xylocaine.)  This first injection was to give me pain relief for a 3-5 hour window.  If this was successful, then a cortisone shot would most likely work.

xylo

What got injected in round 1

What this first injection caused was pain, swelling, and not to mention, the fact I almost passed out during the shot!  That’s not surprising, because I have a history of passing out with needles….the first time I attempted to give blood when I was 18, after getting a flu shot at the student health center in university as part of a flu study trial (which I got paid $40 for by monitoring the injection site for two weeks)…some of the more recent ones also involved when I gave blood.  Not during the process, but after.  Donated blood and got lightheaded and had to sit down and get help from workers at Safeway grocery store…..TWICE.  My personal favorite was when I walked through The Bay department store after donating blood and then went to check out at the till and passed out briefly.  They had to get the workers at the blood clinic (it’s in the same mall) to come down with a wheelchair to get me, wheel me back, and phone my husband.  Oh, and lets back pedal to the original needle pass out occasion—when I went and got my belly button pierced when I was 15 (but lied that I was 16) and as I walked back to the car with my mom I passed out in an alley in West Allis.  I still have a scar on my elbow to prove it.  I think I was so hyped up that passing out just seemed like the right thing to do.

So, with all those needle freak outs/meltdowns/pass outs, you would have to know I would not handle this injection well.  The doctor had to go in blindly to my foot, without using ultrasound, and had to try it three times until he knew the injection had taken.  It was on the third time that I had to lay down, starting sweating, and started seeing stars.  I left the office after the first injection with high hopes, but then found myself walking around the house in pain, and I couldn’t even put full pressure on my foot, let alone put my shoe on my foot.

first shot

First injection…before seeing stars

By the morning, my foot was better.  I had phoned the doctor a the previous night as the pain was overtaking me, and he believed that the shot may have irritated my arthritis.  Great.  So, a normal person would then cancel their second appointment for the cortisone.  I did not.

I am getting desperate, as I need to somehow function for the next four weeks and finish my training, do some races, and then run the race of my life:  The 120th Boston Marathon.  While Boston is all about completion, I have put a ton of training in, and don’t want to take it ‘easy.’  I still plan on pushing myself, though, I don’t necessarily expect a personal best.  So a week later, I went in for the cortisone.

before shot two

Selfie before the cortisone injection…a tad unsure!

I was better prepared for the needle, and it only took two times to get it injected into the correct spot.  I also creepily took a video of the doctor during the first injection, as to keep my mind off of just thinking about the pain.  This helped, and I didn’t pass out.  I know, after looking at my photos, its obvious I have a tattoo on my foot.  And I have many others too.  But tattoos never cause the pass-out feeling.  Just when the needle is actually under my skin….ugh.  So the cortisone shot was over and done.  The kicker with the cortisone was needing to take one week off of running.  I figured this was worth the chance of possibly being in less pain and having my foot less swollen after.

During those days off, my foot felt good.  It not swell like after the first injection.  I spent lots of time using my TENS machine and taking baths.  Once a week was up, my first training runs (Starting March 7th) went well.  By run 4, however, my foot was flaring up while doing a tempo workout.  Maybe the cortisone won’t help….and then on Sunday I went out to do a long run of 2 hours and 45 minutes max (20 miles max) and stopped at 14.25 miles.  While every mile was in the pace range I aim for during long runs, my foot was throbbing and I just didn’t want to push on.

smart ass

iMessages with my mom, post-cortisone

Does that mean I would quit during Boston if the pain took over?  Hell no.  I just don’t want to make it worse before Boston.  That seems silly because training for Boston and doing races in town before Boston is obviously messing it up more.  If the pain takes over in Boston, I know adrenaline, support, and absolute awe will take over.